Catnip

Name

Botanical Name

Family

Native to

 

 

 

Water

Sun

Soil

Height

Width

Space

Catnip

Nepeta cataria

Lamiaceae

 

The Himalayas - from Kumaon to Sikkim and Bhutan on poor, stony soil and rocky ledges at altitudes of 3,000 - 5,000 feet

 

Moist

Full sun to part shade in hot weather

Tolerates any type soil, but prefers poor, infertile 

12-36"

12-36"

36"

Price

4" Pots:  $2.20

6" Pots: $ 3.50

Terracotta pots and other planters: 

Prices Vary

Description

Leaves are pale green with serrated edges.  Flowers are pale mauve on terminal whorls.  They appear from mid-summer to autumn.  The plant has a strong anti-septic, mint-like scent.

Keeping it Going

  • Prefers moist soil in full sun to part shade in hot climates.  

  • Keep out of reach of cats... they will park themselves in your yard and eat your catnip down to the ground.  

  • Ideally suited for poor, infertile soil

  • Will tolerate drought once established

Won't Tolerate

  • Temperatures below 45 degrees F

  • Extreme wind, sun, and temperature swings

History

&

Points of Interest

  • Originally from the Himalayas - from Kumaon to Sikkim and Bhutan.  It is found on poor, stony soil and rocky ledges at altitudes of 3,000 - 5,000 feet.

  • Because it was used as a remedy for many ailments, colonists and travelers often brought this herb with them.  It is now found growing along roadsides, in field edges and gardens around the world.

  • Uses:  Medicinal, culinary... and as a stimulating treat for cats.

  • Parts used:  leaves and flowering stems - dried or fresh

  • For medicinal purposes:  A tea made with catnip is said to reduce fever, increase perspiration, and acts as a mild sedative.  It can also be applied externally to cuts and bruises.  Always consult a physician before trying home remedies.

  • Very attractive to bees, butterflies, and other pollinators

  • Lastly, cats love it.  

©2017 by Provence Art and Antiques. Proudly created with Wix.com